Your donation will be
matched to save 17 acres
& protect Pleasant Bay!
Muddy-Creek-looking-downstream-by-David-Colantuono-The-Cape-Codder

Your donation will be matched dollar-for-dollar until we reach $550,000, which will enable the Harwich Conservation Trust (HCT) to reach its $1.6 million goal to preserve 17 acres in East Harwich/Chatham with approx. 1,400 feet of shoreline on Monomoy River (Muddy Creek) that flows into Pleasant Bay at Jackknife Cove.  We have a chance to preserve this landscape on the Harwich/Chatham border to not only help protect the water quality of the tidal river & Pleasant Bay, but also to protect important wildlife habitat, history, and a future walking trail destination. Photo above by David Colantuono, The Cape Codder.

Click here to learn more!

 

Native Nightlife Walk
under the Sturgeon Moon:
Saturday, August 20th
HCT-full-moon-by-Gus-Romano_opt

Sponsored by Harwich Conservation Trust (HCT), join 12th generation Cape Codder Todd Kelley and Native American Nipmuc/Wampanoag Marcus Hendricks on a walk exploring the cultural and natural nightlife of Cape Cod. Learn about the lifeways of the First People (Native Americans) as well as old Cape Codders in relation to the rhythms of native flora and fauna at dusk and during the night. This walk takes place around the time of the August full moon, also called the  “Sturgeon Moon.”  Explore the many ways that the natural world flourishes after diurnal (daytime) birds and animals go to bed and crepuscular (dawn and dusk) wildlife as well as nocturnal wildlife become active. HCT is offering this walk in partnership with the Eastham Conservation Foundation (Eastham’s local land trust) in celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the U.S. National Park Service. This moderate walk with some soft sand is recommended for ages 12 and up. Full moon photo above by Gus Romano.

Day/date: Saturday, August 20th
Rain day: Sunday, August 21st
Time: 5:30pm – 7:30pm
Cost: $15.00 per person
Directions:  The walk will take place in Eastham at the Cape Cod National Seashore. You will receive directions with your reservation confirmation email.
Space is limited, so pre-registration (payment) is required.

Click here to pay online & reserve!

Free, guided walk: Aug. 19
Birds & Butterflies
of Thompson’s Field

American Lady on Cone Flower at TFJanetDiMattia_opt
Sponsored by Harwich Conservation Trust (HCT), join Town of Harwich Conservation Administrator Amy Usowski on Friday, August 19th (10:00 – 11:30 a.m.) for a walk to learn about the natural history, birds, butterflies (photo of American lady above by Janet DiMattia), and other pollinators of Thompson’s Field.  This walk is free, but please register in advance by emailing hctwalks@gmail.com .

Directions:
From Rt. 39, take Chatham Road southeast 0.75 mile to a parking area on the left (opposite Walton Road).

 

 

September Walk Series
Explore Native
Monomoyick Territory

sunset_by_Charles_Burke_opt
Sponsored by Harwich Conservation Trust (HCT) and the local land trusts in Chatham and Orleans as well as the Native Land Conservancy, join 12th generation Cape Codder Todd Kelley and native Nipmuc/Wampanoag Marcus Hendricks for a fascinating series of interpretive walks describing the natural landscapes of three specific locations within the centuries old Monomoyick Territory. Explore the historic stories that unfolded on each of these lands at the time of European first contact. Consider the lives of the First People and how dramatically their lives and the land itself were influenced and altered during this brief window of time in the seventeenth century. (Photo above courtesy of Charles Burke)

Cost:
$45.00 for the series (if you join one or all three walks, it’s a one-time fee of $45.00)

Click here to learn more about the series & reserve!

The Wilsons bring owls that are found locally including great-horned owl with golden irises, red morph screech owl and the soda can-sized saw-whet owl. They also showcase owls from around the globe, including the Eurasian eagle owl (largest owl species in the world) and the South American spectacled owl. The barred owl with its dark charcoal-colored eyes and the striking snowy owl will also make an appearance. – See more at: http://harwichconservationtrust.org/eyes-on-owls/#sthash.l69lwALO.dpuf